Event

An unattested person alignment u̱t‑Maꞌin with possible logophoric function

This study examines the distribution of Reported Speaker and Reported Addressee pronouns in a corpus of u̱t‑Maꞌin narrative spoken texts to understand what motivates the shift in pronouns between 2SG and 3SG for Reported Addressees.

Exploring the logophoric continuum

On logophoric phenomena across West Africa, including grammatical marking of both reported speaker and reported addressee, how logophoric forms fit into language systems, and extensions of logophoric forms to related functions.

Clause final negation and double negation in Northwest Kainji

Using morphosyntax as a diagnostic tool for untangling the varied negative marking in Northwest Kainji.

Building Multilingual Comparable Corpora

Building on existing corpora and new documentary fieldwork in West Africa, we are creating a multilingual comparative corpus. We present a technology toolkit and three parallel workflows that can be used to mobilize language materials for a variety of purposes, particularly for the discovery of discourse patterns in legacy materials.

Songs: Language Choice and Verbal Art

Women of the u̱t‑Maꞌin community use a variety of languages in everyday life and in poetic performance. I present hypotheses about sociolinguistic dynamics that drive the use of particular languages in songs.

Reported Speech in u̱t‑Maꞌin

A look at two constructions used for speech reporting in u̱t‑Maꞌin narrative texts and an overview of how the form of speech reporting constructions can extend beyond the bounds of the speech domain.

Marked nominative alignment from reanalyzed relative clauses: Towards an explanation of prefixes and suffixes in Northwest Kainji argument marking

In this study I argue that the innovative suffix-marked nominative form is the result of reanalyzing a relative clause structure as main clause syntax. These clauses function are syntactically independent, and yet are somehow discourse dependent with limited occurrence in narrative texts.

Ubiquitous Association in u̱t‑Maꞌin

The u̱t‑Maꞌin associative morpheme is in widespread use across different four distinct syntactic constructions. Understanding these diverse uses of the associative and the accompanying agreement marking is crucial to understanding the grammar of the language.

University of Oregon Ph.D Defense

A presentation and defense of my Ph.D dissertation — Nominalization and predication in U̱t‑Maꞌin.

Development of U̱t‑Maꞌin Progressive Constructions

The morphological complexity of the U̱t‑Maꞌin noun class system holds the key to understanding the distinct elements of the two Progressive constructions.